4000 Level Courses

2021-22 Academic Year

Draft course outlines will be made available on or before June 2, 2021.  Please visit your course OWL site for final course outlines. 

4208G - Canada and the Age of Conflict, 1896-1945

"Modern" Canada was largely shaped between 1896 and 1945, decades that witnessed a massive immigration boom, two world wars, and an economic depression. This upper-year seminar course will examine such issues as politics, war, regionalism, culture, gender, sexuality, modernity, class, race, ethnicity, religion, industrialization, urbanization, nationalism, foreign affairs, and age/generation.

Syllabus
Professor: R. Wardhaugh
Term: Winter
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above
Anitrequisite(s): History 4207E
Extra Information: 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course
International Relations Approved

4296G - Selected Topics in Canadian History - Indigenous Peoples and Public History

This course will explore Canadian public history as it relates to Indigenous Peoples. Several aspects and venues of 'public history' will be examined, including the erection of statues and monuments, the recognition of cultural landscapes, acts of public ceremony, and both the 'display' and repatriation of ancestral remains. While this course will consider theoretical frameworks associated with the practice of public history, it will also consider Indigenous responses to the field including criticisms of the 'nature/ culture divide' and the concept of 'cultural resource management.' Case studies will include the Indians of Canada Pavilion at Expo 67, the documentary films of Alanis Obomsawin, and the commemoration Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. 

Syllabus
Professor: C. Groat
Term: Winter
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above
Anitrequisite(s): Indigenous Studies 4001G
Extra Information: 3 seminar hours, 0.5 course

4410F - Crime and Society in England, 1800-1900

This seminar explores nineteenth-century reform of the criminal law: the rise of modern policing and the transformation of both the criminal trial and punishment. It considers the impact of gender and class on definitions of crime and the treatment of offenders as well as the historiography of criminal justice.

Syllabus
Professor: A. May
Term: Fall
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above
Anitrequisite(s): History 4411E
Extra Information: 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course

 

4603F - Silk Roads and Spice Routes: Ancient and Medieval Asia and World Contacts

This course will investigate the economic, political, religious, cultural, and technological impact of long distance land and sea trade between Asia and other world religions in ancient and medieval times up to around 1500.

Syllabus
Professor: C. Young
Term: Fall
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above
Extra Information: 3 seminar hours, 0.5 course
Pre-1800 History Course
International Relations Approved

4607G - History of Women and Gender Relations in Africa

In the past African women were powerful leaders, strong economic contributors and respected members of their extended families. This course will examine these historical roles as well as factors that undermined African women's status and changed gender relations, such as slavery, economic forces and colonialism.

Syllabus
Professor: K. McKenna
Term: Winter
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): 2.0 courses in History or Women's Studies, taken at the 2200 level or above if they are History courses or at the 2000 level or above if they are Women's Studies courses
Anitrequisite(s): Women's Studies 4607F/G
Extra Information: 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course
International Relations Approved

4611F - Foreign Relations of the People's Republic of China

This course will examine the foreign relations of the People’s Republic of China from its inception in 1949 through to the present day. The focus of the course will be on China’s political and security relations with global powers, including the Soviet Union/Russian Federation, Japan, India, Iran, and the USA.

Syllabus
Professor: J. Flath
Term: Fall
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above
Extra Information: 3 seminar hours, 0.5 course
International Relations Approved

4703G - Canada and the United States

This course analyses and compares a variety of themes which have been important in the development of both Canadian and American society. It also examines the involved and often difficult relationship of Canada and the United States, with an emphasis on the patterns of political, social, economic and military interaction.

Syllabus
Professor: K. Fleming
Term: Winter
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above
Anitrequisite(s): History 4701E
Extra Information: 3-hour seminar, 0.5 course
International Relations Approved

4708G - Histories of the Circumpolar Norths: 'The Last Imaginary Places'

This course examines the circumpolar Norths - Alaska, Kalaallit Nunaat , Nunavut, Siberia, Saami homelands and more. These regions have long been coveted by resource-hungry southerners and home to "Northerners", Indigenous and otherwise. Coverage includes Indigenous lives, southern imperialism, and how various Norths were conceived and re-conceived in the South.

Syllabus
Professor: P. Krats
Term: Winter
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above
Extra Information: 2 hours, 0.5 course
International Relations Approved

4711F - The First World War: A Revolutionary Experience

This course provides an examination of selected aspects of the First World War in various combatant nations. Among the themes to be discussed are the alliance system, the experience of battle, home-front conflicts, war culture, gender, strategic and tactical decision-making, and the memory of the war.

Syllabus
Professor: J. Vance
Term: Fall
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): 2.0 History courses at the 2200 level or above
Anitrequisite(s): History 4709E
Extra Information: 2 hours, 0.5 course
International Relations Approved

4816B - Digital Research Methods

In this course students will learn how historical content is produced, presented and published online; how to find and evaluate digital primary and secondary sources; and how to use computational techniques to work with digital resources. No previous background in the subject area is required.

Syllabus
Professor: W. Turkel
Term: Winter
Course Delivery: Online asynchronous 
Prerequisite(s): Registration in any academic program at the second-year level or above
Anitrequisite(s): Digital Humanities 2130A/B, Digital Humanities 3902F/G, the former History 2816F/G
Extra Information: 4 seminar hours, 0.5 course

4821F - Spy vs. Spy

An introduction to close reading and how historians can use the techniques of structured intelligence analysis. Working individually and in groups, students will analyze a series of historical case studies from the 20th and 21st centuries. Topics include espionage, cyber war, terrorism, organized crime, homeland security, counterintelligence, and decision support.

Syllabus
Professor: W. Turkel
Term: Fall
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 History course at the 2200 level or above
Extra Information: 2 seminar hours, 0.5 course
International Relations Approved

4000 Level International Relations Program Courses

IR 4703F - Contemporary Challenges in the Global Community I

The capstone seminar in the International Relations Honours Specialization applies historical and political science approaches to challenges relevant to Canada and the global community today. Students initiate, direct and produce a major project with a public policy aimed at the Government of Canada and/or the global community.

Syllabus
Professor: W. Turkel
Term: Fall
Course Delivery: In-person
Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in year 4 of the Honours Specialization in International Relations Module, or permission of the departments.
Anitrequisite(s): The former International Relations 4701E, the former International Relations 4702E
Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 0.5 course